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Archive for the ‘Invasive’ Category

While there are quite a few native Hypericum species (other types of st. Johnswort), the common yellow roadside flower we can currently observe, is not. Hypericum perforatum was introduced to North America in the 1700s. Its origins are in Eurasia. It has “perforatum” in its name because it seems the leaves have perforations when you […]

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This perennial herb from the sunflower family is native to Europe and Eurasia. The plant has distinct finely divided, alternating compound leaves and yellow, button-like flowers. It is a tall plant that branches near the top. Tansy gives off a scent similar to camphor with hints of rosemary. The leaves and flowers are toxic if […]

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Thymeleaf speedwell is another miniature invader from Europe. It is present in my lawn. I don’t mind particularly, because the little flowers are beautiful even though you may need magnifying glasses to truly enjoy them. Sure, I could eradicate them from my yard just like some other lawns I’ve seen – the plant can take […]

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This plant is diminutive and has the smallest flowers possible (1/8th of an inch if even that). This is an upright, clumping winter annual that produces small purple, blue or whitish flowers in the spring. The lower portion of the plant has leaves that are round-to-oblong, while the leaves on the flowering upper branches are […]

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Celandine is native to Europe and Western Asia, but it has been present in North America for almost 400 years, as it hitched a ride with the earliest European settlers. Back in those days the plant was used as a yellow dye (if you break a stem you will see the yellow sap), and it […]

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I have to admit I kind of like the sight of these little annual plants in early spring – they are one of the first to flower, and now in mid May they are already dispersing seed into the yard. This little plant is actually pretty much impossible to get rid of. You can pull […]

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There are miles and miles of highway on and off cape. Although those artificially created corridors are intended for human traffic, they are also occasionally used by wildlife and plantlife to get around. Granted, when it comes to wildlife it is more often a treshold, boundary and all too often, killing field. I put a […]

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