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Archive for the ‘Invasive’ Category

On the day after Christmas we decided to explore a new trail, this time in Chatham. Our plan was to drive to the trail, hike it for an hour or so, and then grab lunch at one of our favorite restaurants in town. I had Googled “hiking trails in Chatham” and picked the “Frost Fish […]

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It makes sense to discuss these two plants in the same blog, as they are both very common, look very much alike, and can often be found next to one another… Both forms of chickweed have leaves that are elliptical in shape and alternate on the stem. Common chickweed leaves are hairless while the mouse […]

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The common name of this natively European plant comes from an old tale about Queen Anne, a fervent lacemaker, who pricked herself on a needle, causing a drop of blood to fall on the lace. The flower structures of the plant are very much lace-like. In some of the flowers there is indeed a tiny […]

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I noticed this flowering creeping perennial at the wildflower garden at the Museum of Natural History. I thought “how lovely” because I had no clue what it was, initially. Moneywort, as this turned out to be, is native to Europe, and was introduced in North America as a horticultural plant. It first got here in […]

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This yellow-flowering perennial is native to Europe, Asia and North Africa, but can now be found worldwide. The name comes from the leaves that seem to be arranged in threes, resembling a flat-footed bird’s foot. In actuality those are just the most visible leaves out of a quintet. The plant will flower until September and […]

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The leaves of this European plant are a grayish-green color with soft, velvety hairs. Common mullein is a biennial. In its first year, it grows leaves in a basal rosette It sends up a flower stalk and produces seeds in the second year.  Most of the flowering mullein plants I’ve seen have been a respectable 3 to […]

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There is some disagreement on whether this plant is native or not. Achillea millefolium is a plant omnipresent in Europe and Asia, and most think that it was introduced in North America in early colonial times. Others seem to think that there is a native species, although it is indistinguishable from the Eurasian plant. I’ll consider […]

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For some reason I always associated this plant with poisons brewed back in medieval times, but that would have been deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna). This plant from Eurasia is to be found all over the cape in moist and semi-shaded thickets and brush. It is all over my yard as well. Although it may not […]

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The common name of this pretty little annual or biennial flower comes from the town of Deptford in England where the plant grew abundantly. Deptford has long since been incorporated into larger London, and any pasture or woodland has been paved over or covered in concrete. This plant is native to most of Europe and […]

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Orange hawkweed was first introduced from Europe into New England because of its attractive flame-colored flowers – it is a beautiful plant: Orange hawkweed has matted hairy leaves and handsome flowers, each about an inch in diameter and usually red on the margin, merging into an orange-colored center. The flowering branches, or shoots, grow from […]

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