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Archive for the ‘Edible’ Category

This species of spiderwort is also fairly common in the eastern US, including Massachusetts. I can tell it apart from Tradescantia ohiensis because I acquired virginia spiderwort from a plant center with purple-pink, rather than blue flowers. T. ohiensis also has a blue tint on the stems. However, you can’t rely just on color – […]

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Synonyms: Ohio spiderwort, Bluejacket, Snotweed This member of the Commelinaceae family is one of the first plants to push its leaves up to the sun in springtime. In early March there was 2 to 3 inches of growth already. However, it still had a long way to go – the spiderwort doesn’t bloom until late […]

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The royal fern prefers moist to wet soils in partial to full shade. It also likes rich, humusy, acidic soils, but adapts to less perfect conditions, such as my woodland garden. The soil there is definitely more sandy, but over time the leaves from the overhead canopy, with some assistance from bacteria and worms, will […]

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Cinnamon fern is one of the larger ferns we have – I have a handful in the woodland garden, reaching over 4 feet in height. The plants are quite beautiful: The fertile fronds appear first as furry fiddleheads, ultimately becoming stiff, erect, and soon turn a chocolate brown color – very much like a stick […]

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While I do not have canada mayflower in my yard, there are several patches on my street and alongside other streets abutting woods and woodlands. I noticed the leaves of these plants last fall, and thought I was dealing with lilly of the valley. An easy mistake to make, in fact: The other name for […]

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Wild sarsaparilla sprouts up just about everywhere in my woodland garden, even the lawn. This perennial woodland plant is an indicator species of rich moist woodlands, although it seems to be thriving in a more sandy and rocky environment. Aralia nudicaulis sends up a single, long-stalked leaf and flowering stalk from a very short stem. […]

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Viola pedata is a violet native to states east of the Rockies, from Texas to Maine (but not in Florida for some reason). This plant is different in three ways – First, the leaves are deeply lobed. Second, there are no hairs near the throat of the flower. Third, and last: Unlike other violets this […]

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For many years, I admired these plants at a friend’s house on the cape. They were the only species in a 3 by 20 feet border alongside the wall, and they looked magnificent. When my friend got sick of these plants 2 years ago, opting for more colorful bloomers, I took the opportunity to take […]

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Well, I am not really assessing anything – I only wanted to highlight the fact that I am taking a break today from yard and garden work. Not that the garden is not assessment-worthy: There have been some accomplishments and early successes: The woodland garden in front of the house holds pretty much all the […]

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I have a few of these members of the Dryopteridaceae family in my woodland garden, among sessile bellwort and framing some oak and rhododendron. The plants have only been there for a year, and I’ve only seen the sterile fronds of this fern. The fern is also called bead fern because the fertile fronds that […]

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