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Back in March of 2011 I wrote about the appearance of bobcats on Cape Cod, now we are actually seeing what some have predicted – the return of the black bear to Cape Cod. The black bear, according to Mass Wildlife, has not been seen on Cape Cod since the 1700s. I refer┬áback to some […]

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This species of coreopsis likes well-drained soil and full sun. It is the only coreopsis with pink flowers (most others are yellow). It is native to 8 states on the East Coast, including Massachusetts, and Nova Scotia. It is endangered or of special concern in most of these places. I have several cultivated coreopsis species, […]

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I’ve known about Echinacea, the herbal supplement, since childhood. In Europe it’s been an essential ingredient of several cold and flu medications. Most of the research on the uses and benefits of this plant was done in Europe, Germany in particular. Although there remains some scepticism about the validity of the studies, researchers contest that […]

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Lobelia cardinalis produces spikes of bright fire red flowers for about a month. I added these to the woodland garden to attract hummingbirds, and so far they have not disappointed. These little avian wonders have a smorgasbord to select from, with bee balm and a nectar feeder to boot, but they make the extra effort […]

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I know my woodland garden is entering a new phase when the beebalm starts blooming. Summer and humid days are here, the canopy above is much more stingy with letting light through (even the caterpillar damaged twigs are sprouting new leaves), and lush growth is all around. At the same time days are getting noticably […]

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Phytolacca americana is a tall fast-growing perennial, native to the eastern US. Currently pokeweed is starting to show greenish-white flowers, and in late summer and fall the plant will produce dark red berries that grow even darker over time. The juice of the berries was once used as an ink substitute, and to add color […]

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This plant was a total surprise addition to my garden. I had some Chelone glabra delivered last fall for a late fall planting, and somehow or other this plant made it into the mix. Probably the result of a pre-dawn or pre-coffee loading of the delivery truck. The plant is almost 5 feet tall and […]

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This species of spiderwort is also fairly common in the eastern US, including Massachusetts. I can tell it apart from Tradescantia ohiensis because I acquired virginia spiderwort from a plant center with purple-pink, rather than blue flowers. T. ohiensis also has a blue tint on the stems. However, you can’t rely just on color – […]

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Also known as, and “potentially” re-classified as Sibbaldiopsis tridentata, this species of cinquefoil grows wild over most of the Northern Hemisphere, including the high arctic regions (i.e. Greenland). Talk about being resilient – the plant can withstand temperatures as low as -40 degrees Fahrenheit, while on the other side of the spectrum it tolerates drought […]

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Synonyms: Ohio spiderwort, Bluejacket, Snotweed This member of the Commelinaceae family is one of the first plants to push its leaves up to the sun in springtime. In early March there was 2 to 3 inches of growth already. However, it still had a long way to go – the spiderwort doesn’t bloom until late […]

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